1975 Yamaha YZ250B Progress

My Yamaha barn find was not quite as good as I  hoped internally, this is to be setup as a race bike so cosmetic repairs were not the priority, it was mechanical:

  1. Engine cases were split, new seals inserted
  2. New Bottom end, top end was actually ok.
  3. Transmission overhauled and  three gears replaced.
  4. Rear suspension needed full overhaul.
  5. New air filters.
  6. Front end was good.
  7. Exhaust was great.
  8. Carby was cleaned, re-jetted  and engine intakes were replaced.
  9. Spark disappeared after 5 minutes, new coil and cdi unit fixed that.
  10. Many new bolts to replace the old ones.
  11. My spare tank had been repaired and repainted,  but that looks too good to use on a race bike.
  12. Result so far is nice running motor. Very crisp 2 stroke with lots of power, these are race motors not trail bikes.

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Yamaha MX360 Progress

Finally got started on the Yamaha MX360 project, the bike was a solid bike to begin with, exhaust has no dents at all but bike had no spark. The CDI was same as another bike I had so a swap quickly determined it to be the problem, once replaced a strong spark was seen. A new modern CDI from the UK (www.rexs-speedshop.com), a new coil, some new plastics and a nice tank I already had improved the bike. The carby was stuffed completely, a new one with correct pre-jetting from www.mikunioz.com immediately allowed the bike to fire up.

New bars, grips, new air filter, oil change, replacement bolts where needed, some metal polish and a sand blasting of the engine covers before repainting them gave it some shine too.

A test run showed almost nil clutch so some new plates were required and now it will actually idle in gear without trying to move off on you.

Maybe some new wheels is next but since these bikes don’t have a great price then must watch the level invested in.

First ride impression, not much power down low but when the revs build up it then makes you hang on tight. Cheap spark plug cap broke and fuel hose needed a clamp, other than that it starts easy and runs fine. Old Yellow is alive again.

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Metal Polishing

Not everyone is aware that a simple bench grinder can be quickly turned into a metal polishing too and some restorations parts on the bike can be made like new in a few minutes with this tool.

If you had enough parts to repair/restore then you can bundle them up and take them to be replated and pay for it too and then wait to get them back, that is a good process but if you have only a few bits or just like doing as much of the work yourself then get one of these going in your shed.

This one is a cheap grinder bought at the local hardware store, remove the grinding wheels etc and add on the required shafts, buffing wheels and buy some polishing compounds, I got all my parts from my local Bunnings, very simple to do. Check out this support page http://www.caswellplating.com/buffman.htm

metal polisher

It is simple to use and you can see result below, these 2 metal pieces were identical, both slightly corroded after 40 years, I polished 1 for about 60 seconds on the wheel, the difference is instant.

bolt_polished

 

 

CR125 in Flight

Wringing its neck, full throttle…

CR125 In Action

CR125 In Action

TM125 Finished at last

One of the hardest parts to find for the Suzuki TM125 was an intact magneto cover that still had the bolt holes to attach the sprocket cover to….. very rare. Chain throws were so common back then that sprocket covers must have been flying off everywhere.

After nearly 12 months searching I found one on ebay that someone managed to do a good repair on, painted up it looks all ok as the repair is on the inside, the sprocket cover fitted on nicley, finally finished the bike.


1974 Suzuki TM250 Update

These are nice bikes to ride, the after market pipe gives it a solid crackle sound. Not a lot was required on this bike as it was maintained to race.

I sent some parts out to be zinc plated so small fittings and bolts look new, will get round to painting the tank one day. For now just ride it.

Suzuki TM125 Pipe

Real nice after market Bassani pipe, no dents, makes the TM125 look like a racer.

Suzuki TM125 Motor

Fully recon Suzuki TM125 motor installed…

Suzuki TM125 Tank

I had the professsional do a full restoration on a 1974 Suzuki TM125 tank with new graphics and clear coat over top to finish off the job.  They did a great job, good enough to put in a trophy cabinet on its own as some do.

YZ250B YZ360B Tank

For those who need to get your old vmx tank restored, you can do well by talking to your local auto body shop. I sent this old aluminium Yamaha YZ360B tank that was once on a USA yellow model to my guy Zac in Perth (0404 253 260) and he did a great job in repairing, smoothing and finishing the tank in white, very impressed by his work and the price was more than fair.

Next step was to find some new graphics, only problem I could not locate any at all for the Euro white model YZ360B YZ250B. There was some on ebay for the yellow model in the USA but not the white model. The solution, I went to my local sign shop and gave them an original tank that had the Yamaha graphics and my newly restored white tank, hey presto, 2 hours later they rang for me to pick it up – all finished and looks great. These guys have the digital artwork on computer now and can print out as many copies as they want if  you need a set for your white tank.

Before

Graphics supplied by Total Sign Co in Perth (08 9345 3240) www.totalsignco.com.au

New TM125 Plastics

One thing that makes any resto look good is new plastics and polished aluminium forks. I had to put the plastics in place so it starts to look like a bike …

1974 Suzuki TM125

STEP 1: The next project started is a 1974 Suzuki TM125. After stripping down and getting parts (many more needed yet) the project begins with the frame reassembly… Beautiful frame job.

This is what they are supposed to look like in 1974

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1973 Honda CR250 Bike Test

1973_honda_cr250_bAt one time or another, you’ve sat around with your friends and jabbered about the mythical “composite” motorcycle. You know the one -it’ got the peak horsepower of a breathed·on Pursang, combined with the low-end grunt of a Stiletto. It`s got the plush forks of a Maico, turns like a CZ and tracks like a cut-frame Husky. It weighs less than a good 250 and has the punch of a 400. And the best part-you don’t have to do anything to the bike. just ride it like it was a 350 Honda pseudo-scrambler.

We’ve all dreamed about that kind of a machine, but up until now, it never existed.

A quick look around at the competition mounts of the Staff of DIRT BIKE shows what has to be done to make a motorcycle “right” for competition. No one but a fool rides a Maico in stock trim. Different filters, rims and assorted bozos are a must for the serious rider. Continue reading